The Problem of Packaging - Try this simple packaging test. Go to your local farmers market, buy some vegetables then watch the trader pop them into a brown paper bag. There’s something reassuring about seeing it flipped over to seal the pack with a twist.

Next stroll into your nearest supermarket and try to buy anything, really anything, that isn’t pre-wrapped in plastic. Even the bags provided for the limited selection of un-pre-packed veg will be a form of plastic.

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Tangy, with earthy hints of sweet almost caramel notes; balsamic vinegar is the perfect accompaniment to my baked fig and goat cheese tartine.

Genuine balsamic vinegar is made from a reduction of white trebbiano grapes. There are several grades of balsamic vinegar, with the real deal stuff being produced in the Modena and Reggio Emilia regions of Italy. Traditional balsamic vinegar is protected origin (PDO) and has a long and esteemed history as a restorative tonic/digestive.

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A perfect storm of sweet, savory, nutty, pungent, salty, all combined in an unassuming little piece of cheese. Gruyere is a PDO cheese from Switzerland. 

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Food fight turns its attention to the Agri-Chem and seed giant Monsanto once again. It’s not another passage in the continuing controversy over their top seller glyphosate this time; although California has ordered that to be labelled carcinogenic.

No, it’s another powerful herbicide produced by Monsanto and a couple of other companies like German leviathan BASF that’s been branded a villain this time. It’s called dicamba. This month two US states, Missouri and Arkansas, have banned dicamba after a mass of complaints about a problem called drift. Nice word drift, it conjures up visions of floating down a river on a dinghy or drifts of wild flowers in a mountain meadow.
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Forget the EMMY’s forget the BAFTA’s the whole of Britain is bubbling with anticipation for the award for the best fish and chip shop in the country.
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Bohemian Mojo has been following the nightmare unfolding in our fields, pastures and orchards with the terrifying collapse of the honeybee population.

Like others we’ve watched it happening with a sense of despair and disbelief. How could mankind do this we ask ourselves? We realize the implications this collapse holds for the human food chain will be dramatic. After all around a third of our fruits, vegetables and cereals depend on bees for fertilization. A third is a lot; a hell of a lot. But here we are again.

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